Saturated Fat: Still No Association With Cardiovascular Disease

Despite widespread belief that saturated fat consumption is related to cardiovascular disease, research has not uncovered any association between the two. Recently, in a major Japanese study on saturated fat intake published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers measured the dietary habits of 58,453 men and women and followed up with them for 14.1 years. Data indicated that people who ate the most saturated fat did not differ from those who ate the least with regard to heart attack risk. In fact, those who ate the most saturated fat were less likely to experience a cardiovascular event than those who ate the least (although this finding was not statistically significant). Notably, people who ate the most saturated fat had a lower risk of stroke than those who ate the least, and stroke is a larger public health threat in Japan than cardiovascular disease. Read the original empirical article in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.